Author Archives: adam

Hanif Kureishi, The Buddha of Suburbia (1990)

Contributed by Litpop bookclub member, Clare McMahon – many thanks Clare! This month’s book was the Hanif Kureishi’s highly acclaimed The Buddha of Suburbia. It spans a time from the early seventies to early eighties, from south London suburbia, the … Continue reading

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Salman Rushdie, The Ground Beneath Her Feet (1999)

[This month’s blog is courtesy of Howard Becke, a long-standing and hugely well-informed Litpop regular] If this was a record review then I feel safe in saying that this book would be in the “Prog Rock” section. It is large … Continue reading

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Steve Earle, I’ll Never Get Out of This World Alive (2011)

On balance, Steve Earle’s novel proved to be as big a hit with Litpoppers as it had with the likes of Patti Smith.  Our characteristically well-informed participants speculated how Earle had transformed the often grim realities of his own life … Continue reading

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Michael Chabon, Telegraph Avenue (2012)

Is this the ultimate, definitive ‘litpop’ novel? Judging by the overwhelmingly positive responses from this week’s bookclubbers, perhaps so. Yes, it is big; yes, the second scene (set in a nostalgia trade-fair) was a curveball that made your head spin … Continue reading

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Pauline Black, Black by Design

Pauline Black’s painfully and beautifully candid memoir did more than provide this month’s bookclub with understandings of one young woman’s growth into a fiercely independent figure, respected and influential in the world of music and beyond; it also fleshed out … Continue reading

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Nile Rodgers, Le Freak

This book was generous and non-judgemental in spirit, and featured a dizzying roll-call of creative figures. Suitably, then, Nile Rodgers’ inclusive biography-cum-cultural history was prefaced by a dedication to his ‘biological, spiritual, and musical family’. This references one of Sister … Continue reading

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Toni Morrison, Jazz

This month’s bookclub, looking at Toni Morrison’s 1992 novel Jazz, was one of the most animated and animating there’s been. Contributors wondered if their (almost wholly) positive responses were to do with the way the book combined relatively simple diction … Continue reading

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Nick Coleman, The Train in the Night: A Story of Music and Loss

It isn’t unusual for people to have deeply personal responses to books, whether they’re fiction or non-fiction: that is a large part of why many of us read, to find some connection, some identification, that helps us make sense of … Continue reading

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Kazuo Ishiguro’s Nocturnes

This month’s discussion of the five stories in Kazuo Ishiguro’s Nocturnes did what any good discussion of a book, and so any good bookclub, should do: changed minds (not least mine!). In giving their ‘first impressions’ most – but not … Continue reading

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